In National Grief Awareness Week (2th - 9th December 2019), Manchester based company Talespin Theatre have given us a powerful play about the impact that grief has on one family and how each individual person in this family deals with the trauma and loss of a family member. At times, it’s not an easy watch and could be uncomfortable for some but Talespin handles the situations that arise with great care and sensitivity and the writers and co-creators Marissa Moore (who also directs) and Jordan Kennedy construct both meaningful and pertinent dialogue throughout the play.

Edward II by Christopher Marlowe is one of the greatest pieces of English theatre ever written and throughout the years the play been adapted and reimagined by many companies far and wide. Now it is the turn of Liverpool based MT Productions to give their account of this famous power play in their own unique way.

At Heaven’s Gate, written and directed by Adam Leyland, is the debut play from Script Suppliers. Set in an old people’s home, the curtains are almost drawn for geriatric Romeo, Arthur (Callum Forbes), and sidekick Frank (Ryan K Byrne) as their life alternates between Baywatch and Babestation with only one of the two female residents, Edith (Laura Chassels) – best not to mention diabetic Debbie – to keep these over-exuberant boys out of trouble: well, as much as their creaking joints will let them get into.

It's that time of the year when theatres are bringing families together and presenting much loved and well known tales to life in pantomime.....Stop right there! The Royal Court in Liverpool breaks with tradition with The Scouse Snow White, which I must emphasise is an adult only pantomime so don't even think of taking the kids or anyone of a sensitive nature!

Liverpool city centre certainly doesn’t know what’s going to hit it when Arabella decides to go out on the razzle and sort her boyfriend out!

Make up – check.             Attitude – check               Mobile phone – of course!

Hair extensions (they always look good on Arabella) check or maybe, not check? Start the ominous music and dim the lights, something weird is lurking in those fine extensions.

Ugly Bucket’s Good Grief, directed by Rachael Smart and Grace Gallagher, is a surreal comedy about death. Created for Tim Miles, at his request, to be performed at his memorial service, the show deals with many aspects of life, death and grief in a unique and very entertaining way.

The Nutcracker is at the heart of the English National Ballet. Wayne Eagling’s Nutcracker is the 10th production that the company has done and is full of new interpretations, exciting choreography, elaborate, breath-taking set designs and beautiful costumes.

With a title part-taken from an Emily Bronte poem about defiance, No Coward Soul, written and performed by Emily Parr, is a one-woman tragicomedy about coping with modern day life as a cynical romantic, striving to survive alone in the midst of a painfully amicable divorce, and raising that question time immemorial: why must everything be so difficult?

Giuseppe Verdi’s 1851 opera Rigoletto is based on Victor Hugo’s notorious play ‘Le roi s’amuse’ which was banned after only one performance in 1832 for causing offence to both public morality and political sensibility. Verdi’s re-telling thankfully got past the censors to provide a three act play which exposes the counter-morality at play in society.

This week, Make it Write Productions has put on Start Square, a new play by Sharon Colpman. Start Square tells the story of Arthur Watts and his struggles in life after his wife leaves him. When Dorothy Fry appears on the scene, secrets start to be revealed.

Opera was slow to catch on in England during 17th C and Rinaldo, composed by George Frideric Handel with libretto prepared by Giacomo Rossi, was the first Italian language opera written specifically for the London stage in 1711.